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Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana

Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana

Introduction

Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana is a hip opener as well as a shoulder opener. It is one of the advanced yoga postures that give many benefits to the practitioner.

Sometimes, this posture is ALSO known as Parivritti Janusirsasana.

This posture stretches the hamstring muscles and groin region.

Let us examine its meaning, steps, and benefits.

Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana Information

Pose NameParivrtta Janu Sirsasana
Sanskrit Nameपरिव्र्त्त जानु शीर्षासन
IASTparivrtta jānu śīrṣāsana
English NameRevolved Head-to-Knee Pose
LevelAdvanced
GroupJanusirsasana
TypeRevolved forward bending

Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana Meaning

Parivrtta in Sanskrit means revolved or turned around. Janu means knee. Siras is head. Hence we translate this pose name into English as Revolved Head-to-Knee Pose.

Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana Practice Routine

The practice routine includes the precaution measures, preparatory poses, step by step procedure, and follow up postures.

Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana safety and precautions

Pregnant persons should not attempt this posture.

Apart from this, person who have surgery in their lower part of the spine, groin, or knee should avoid this posture.

Those who are suffering from sciatica pain, groin or knee ailments, degenerated disc should take care before attempting this practice. Better, they should consult their physician and get the practice done under competent supervision.

Preparatory Poses

Since this posture belongs to advanced level, one should prepare himself by having the practice of following postures.

Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana Steps

Step 1

Sit in Dandasana. Take a deep breath. Now move your legs apart to the maximum possible extent.

Step 2

Bend the left knee and place it closer to your body so that your bent leg should press the perineum.

Step 3

Raise both hands up parallel to the floor. Forwarding your torso reach out to the right leg and hold it with right hand with thumb on the top side placing right elbow on the floor inside of your right knee. During the reach out, the left hand should be raised up further.

Step 4

Bring the left arm over the head and grasp the right foot adjusting the right shoulder down towards the right leg.

Step 5

Twist the trunk and place the shoulder and head on the right leg with head facing the ceiling to the maximum extent. Breathe normally. Maintain the posture to a comfortable length of time.

Step 6

Release the posture to comeback to upright position. Continue the above steps with bending the right leg.

Duration

One may extend the duration of time as long as he doesn’t feel uncomfortable. Initially, this may be for a period thirty seconds. On mastery this can be extended up to two or three minutes on each side. However, one should practice for equal duration of time on both sides.

Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana Benefits

The following benefits accrue with the practice of Revolved Head-to-Knee Pose.

The Posture improves the flexibility of the knee joints, hip joints, and shoulder joints. It stretches the hamstring muscles and groin region. As a result, it strengthen the muscles of the area.

This posture corrects the postural anomalies developed over time. It helps to increase the capacity to prolong the duration of meditative postures like Padmasana and Siddhasana.

The Posture stretches both sides of the abdomen and inter organs. This improves the functions of Kidney, Adrenal gland, reproductive organs, and lever.

It improves the functions of respiratory system, as it stretches and massage the chest and lungs region.

This posture activates Parasympathetic Nervous System. Hence it helps to manage stress, anxiety, and depression.

Moreover, it supports the treatment for the conditions like Hypertension, Insomnia, Obesity, and Diabetes.

Thirunavukkarasu Sivasubramaniam

He has got 40 years of experience in traditional yoga philosophy and practice. He is well versed in Classical Sanskrit and Classical Tamil texts. His other area of proficiency includes Tantra and South Indian Astrology.

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